Thursday, November 12, 2009

Tom Cable Shouldn't Get a Free Ride, Suspend Him

Why is it that every time the NFL admittedly mentions intolerance of misconduct, but fails to address issues of domestic violence?

In a league where drug addicts, strip club addicts, and dog killers are forced to serve a rigid suspension, shouldn’t the same type of punishment be given to Raiders coach Tom Cable, a disturbed individual who confirmed he has slapped his ex-wife?

Is there anything else?

Yes, two of his previous partners alleged that he used physical violence. All the disturbing and depressing news surfaced when he attacked Raiders assistant coach Randy Hanson, revealing a mystic side of Cable, a coach who has committed his life to Al Davis by following his demands and satisfying the insubordinate boss in order to keep the most demanding and defective job in the league.

Although Davis is desperately known for taking on a risk and keeps renegade players and coaches when everyone else rebuffs interest, Davis may actually make a move before commissioner Rodger Goodell takes charge of the gruesome revelations. Any facades are startling, especially when Cable behaved as an inspiring coach.

But now, his unveiling violent accusations could urge a talented core to turn opposite directions. And then again, they might support him through the allegations until they vanish. Now, mostly a large population disdains Cable, who had emerged as the coach of the future before suddenly breaking Hanson’s jaw and threatening to kill him at training camp during an altercation.

Half of us are waiting for the NFL to address this issue and acknowledge that he seriously needs to spend ample time in counsel. His anger problems are signs that Cable needs to be attended to before it’s too late and he kills someone, which is why Goodell must take a stance and take issues seriously.

The indications and ramifications could even hurt the league in the future, if he turns around and commits similar allegations. In the course of his tenure, Goodell has addressed and handed out suspensions, sending statements to all players and coaches that misconduct would not be tolerated. If so, it shouldn’t take long to address a problematic issue continuing to affect not only the National Football League, but society in general.

I don’t know if suspending Cable is a cure in preventing all domestic violence, which is currently happening now, but it sends a message to the league. What happened to the sternest and unsympathetic Goodell, who used to enforce punishment for shameless athletes? But apparently, Cable is under investigation by the NFL.

Nonetheless, when there’s conclusive evidence by previous partners, including an assistant coach who had to be taken to the hospital to recover from a fractured jaw, there's enough facts to inflict an indefinite suspension, at least until the pending investigation is finalized. This is a time Goodell must be a law enforcer, and take down the bad boy. Ignoring each victim’s side of the story might be a misconception, and should be taken seriously. In fairness, each victim is seeking justice and Goodell must take full accountability.

Hello!

There were witnesses who happened to discover the incident with their own two eyes, and told Napa County Police that Cable snapped and confronted Hanson. Because he can’t control his reactions and tends to erupt into hissy fits, witnesses clarified Cable grabbed him by the shirt before each of them were separated.

To be blunt, witnesses provided enough information for Goodell to wisely declare a suspension, though there isn’t enough evidence to discipline Cable of throwing punches. The league still can’t allow troubling controversy to slide, particularly if skirmishes unprofessionally transpire within an organization.

There’s no doubt in my mind Goodell should be deeply concern. There’s no doubt in my mind Cable shouldn’t have the opportunity to coach for the reminder of the season. And there’s no doubt in my mind Davis dismisses the troubled coach.

In an episode of ESPN's Outside the Lines , much hidden information surfaced on national television, giving us an all-access look at Cable’s overwhelming background. Sadly, he lives his behind-the-scenes life as a wife-beater, according to ex-wife Sandy Cable, who unveiled that she was allegedly physically battered and abused during their marriage.

Marie Lutz wasn’t afraid to tell her side of the story, as well, telling police that Cable angrily grabbed her left arm and sent her to the ground at home, where Lutz saw another woman in her presence and confronted Cable. Moments later, he cowardly pushed her out of the front door and she was taken to the emergency room, where she had apparently suffered back contusions.

Based on all sorts of evidence, these are indications of a man with serious anger problems. Similar to Michael Vick’s bitter protesters during the dog fighting scandal, National Organization for Women president Terry O’Neil told USA Today on Wednesday that Cable should be suspended. Since discontented people are expecting a suspension, I also expect both the league and the Raiders organization to respond.

What more is there to deliberate? He committed a heinous act as severe as Vick’s dog killing and Pacman Jones’ assaults at strip joints. Two police investigations relating to violent allegations in the past 11 months is enough to divulge and declare an indefinite penalty. But he shouldn’t be allowed to get away with his unseen lifestyle.

Making Cable pay the price is the right thing for the league and Goodell.