Monday, November 2, 2009

Hostility No Surprise, but Favre Deserves Better


This was never anticipated, a disgruntled crowd that wasn’t generous to greet Brett Favre with heartwarming receptions when he made a grand entrance by storming out the visitors’ tunnel. Today, animus natives of the Green Bay Packers failed to anoint an unprecedented legend who procured loyalty.

It's fair to postulate that some felt betrayed and had not assessed an ultimate sense regarding Favre’s impulsive transition. On a day his popularity may have unraveled in an unwelcomed return to Lambeau Field, a hostile environment seemed weary of un-retiring comebacks and battered and misled, after general manager Ted Thompson appointed an actual timetable for Favre to make up his damn mind.

In the midst of an everlasting saga, Thompson literally was bothered and emotionally had pondered and refused to allow Favre to join the archrival Minnesota Vikings.

It explains why it wasn’t urgent getting rid of the prolific quarterback, ending a long-lasting saga just to keep away the beloved superstar before trading the two-time MVP to the New York Jets, where he struggled in a horrific season and underperformed. Shortly after, Favre deliberated on whether he should retire or un-retire, but instead opted to return.

Throughout, it has been puzzling to guess on a specific retirement date, but a date doesn’t matter. What matters is, he can persist on fulfilling his zest or revenge if he firmly returned to confirm that he still has a powerful arm, specifically for executing a monstrous drive.

For the most part, the epicenter of football seems to be Favre, whether he's retiring, coming back, playing for his former team's archenemies or seeking revenge against the longtime franchise he committed much of his livelihood to.

But if there’s hoopla referring to Favre, then nonessential hype formulates and hijacks our minds by inspiring us to watch the future Hall of Famer seek vengeance on his former executives and teammates.

Living in an age when sports is based on politics, much of the Favre debates are based on politics. For instance, there are fans in Cheesehead territory who still adore his audacity and enthusiasm to toss passes, still playing as if he’s a raw athlete barely establishing into a legitimate legend, while there are some who still hold grudges.

On this particular day, Packers fans went berserk, badly booing an old-timer who has amused an entire state. To have much hostility against Favre is pathetic, when he steered the Packers to playoff berths and two Super Bowls. True, they were held hostage, ready to move forward with Aaron Rodgers, who patiently waited in the wings and earned his dream job as the starting quarterback.

After he was promised the starting job, the Packers were strictly committed to Rodgers and shut the doors on Favre. Because I believe he came back for vengeance, he still deserved a better reception other than a bitter one that he received. Although we all saw this coming, the belittlement, harassment and derision of their long-time leader was erroneous.

At least, it seemed that taking a brief moment to honor a veteran with much ego and selfishness was a common way to pay tribute to a veteran that installed a winning atmosphere. Instead, Cheesehead maniacs act as true Packers fans, and express bitterness against anyone who signs to play for their archrivals.

By betraying Favre, it is a misconception and weird to visualize, when it seemed as if he only departed yesterday and traveled to Minnesota. Brad Childress, the coach of the Vikings, was desperate enough and accepted the embattled quarterback, to fix deficiencies that greatly were complications hindering prosperity on his fragile offense.

A hostile crowd booed loudly at Lambeau Field. When he arrived and touted out the tunnel they booed, when he warmed up they booed, when he entered to take his first snap they booed and when he called signals from the line of scrimmage they booed.

He was badly insulted and wasn’t praised for signifying grace or dignity on a franchise that signified greatness and yearly rituals when football season approached. Even if his wishy-washy and selfish demeanor is perceived differently, he still deserves credit. But it will never happen as long as he's a Viking.

Yes, his legacy will live on at Green Bay, but it might never be the same, an oddity difficult to keep from degenerating by signing with divisional rivals and enhancing their probability of dominating the division. His presence is the difference for a 7-1 record, including the Vikings' perfect two-game sweep that puts them in good position of topping the Packers.

Just from the rebellious and classless receptions is proof that loyal fans are very distraught with the ex-Packer and believe he’s a traitor, refusing to stay true to an organization that strongly hate the Vikings.

Whether most angry fans are haters or critics just waiting to lambaste Favre, either way, that is, it could be a sign of enviousness toward a former legend for joining the archenemy. But furious supporters still are not over the remarks Favre made publicly weeks ago, when he admittedly said the Vikings are the most talented team.

Yes, those remarks right there are enough to upset a large crowd committed to embracing the Cheeseheads. Sometimes, real football geniuses sit and wonder if Thompson gave up on Favre prematurely and turned to Rodgers. Or sometimes, real Packers fans may agree with Thompson’s decision.

By hearing the warm receptions when Rodgers arrived, gives us the assumption that barbaric fans are content with the up-and-coming gunslinger after enduring a quarterback duel in each meeting against Favre.

Even though he denies vengeance, two victories against his former team at the age 40 is making a statement. He hasn’t played efficient in a long time, unless you are wise enough to include two years ago when he could’ve retired on top after leading the Packers to the NFC Championship game but unfortunately coming up short.

Let’s not fail to realize that we are entitled to make any choices in our lives, meaning Favre is allowed to sign with any team. In the offseason, he singed with the Vikings, deciding on a bold choice and ruining the way people recognize or evaluate him as a person based on his decisions. He’s not necessarily a villain for signing with the Vikings, and I will honestly say his legacy lives on.

Once again, he led the Vikings to a large margin victory, and sent fans to the exits early disappointed to witness a 38-26 victory in a Sunday matinee. Notice Favre is more productive in the passing game, if he's surrounded by an active supporting cast. A plethora of dangerous options offensively is huge for someone of Favre’s age, whereas he isn’t forced to implement a laborious task alone.

There’s no question Adrian Peterson is a game-changing running back and likely is the fastest man in the league. Maybe it’s in the cleats. Take a glance at his shoe collection. Maybe it makes him really explosive.

Meanwhile, in Favre’s emotional return, he dazzled and captivated us by completing 17 of 28 passes for 244 yards and four touchdowns with no interceptions. Unlike last season, he’s careful with the football and avoid sacks, when he scrambles away from rushing defenders and finishes on his mind-blowing throws.

Face it, Favre’s Vikings is too powerful to stop in the NFC North. He mustered consistent drives in his old stadium and shattered angry hearts. Critics and fans need to cut down on the hostility, and praise the savvy old-timer for his work ethic and ability to dominate the game he’s truly passionate in.

Leading a franchise for 16 years signified longevity that isn’t replaceable. But now, he’s portrayed as a villain for wearing a purple jersey and helmet as No. 4 still remains the same. Ever since an ugly departure in Green Bay, where tailgate parties reside, where Lambeau leaps originated and where Favre will always be a legend -- despite an unhappy town that should be courteous enough to praise him -- he's roughly been despised

After leaving behind his memorabilia, it’s worth remembering a lifelong legend eternally instead of booing.