Wednesday, October 21, 2009

Love or Hate, Boo or Kiss: Titletown Rules In Philly

Welcome to Philly, the city of Brotherly Love.

Wait, the city of Brotherly Love, not after the year of 1968 when they booed Santa Claus, becoming notorious for their infamous boos among four major pro sports teams. Fans booed merely anyone who underachieves or criticizes their city and even their own teams.

At halftime of the Philadelphia Eagles game, Philly fans’ booed and hurled snowballs at St. Nick on a snowy day at Franklin Field and watched the last-place Philadelphia Eagles finish the season 2-12, losing to Minnesota. In today’s era, Philly fans’ continues to lack some class. When dislikable athletes remains healthy, they'll shout out disgruntled boos.

For example, former Eagles quarterback Jeff Garcia absorbed a couple of hits that made him daze and confuse, when fans were apparently upset after not getting injured badly. For maintaining good health, it drew booes, as ungenerous Philly devotees badly wished Garcia suffered severe injuries to be replaced by their backup quarterback A.J. Feely.

There have been a number of athletes who have faced scrutiny and criticism, obviously Donovan McNabb’s name is mentioned as a primary target of criticism, getting booed for inconsistency. As a response, he sorely ripped Philly fans, and referred to them as ungrateful supporters when he brought much to the Philly organization.

Notice, you are described as the City of Ungratefully Love and the City that Booed Santa. But, at the same time, fans who craves back-to-back triumph with another championship banner. It's well-deserving for a town, embracing and explicating true sporting passion. And lately the feverish crowd has been lovely and loyal to the Philadelphia Phillies.

A town filled with pride and dignity, is known for the Liberty Bell, known for Rocky climbing the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Arts, and known for Philly cheesesteak eateries at nearly every corner.

Last year, it was a town known for its reprehensible championship droughts. For the first time since the 76ers won the NBA championship in 1983, a major franchise in Philadelphia won a title.

Teams in all four major sporting leagues had at least a championship appearance in this century, but failed winning a championship in 100 consecutive seasons. That was suddenly snapped when the Phillies dominated and shocked the world, ending an atrocious drought. Once again, the frenzied citizens have something worth celebrating after the Phillies are en route to make its second World Series appearance.

Unstoppable dominance absolutely has removed memories of a 15-year relapse. As usual, the Phillies are the closet major pro sports team to maintain poise and uplift humanity. Just a year ago, clinching a title restored joy back in a town, where fans supported its major sporting teams through fragile times.

But now, the hangover is over, as a double dose of glory reappears in what is considered to be the greatest championship appearance in history. The 76ers and Eagles were the last two teams to come close at winning it all.

First, the Sixers advanced to the 2001 NBA finals, a sensational playoff run, led by Allen Iverson. But the run ended in five games against the dominant Los Angeles Lakers. Then, McNabb led the underdog Eagles to the Super Bowl in 2004 against New England, losing a heartbreaker on the grandest stage. Following a downfall, they came close to making a Super Bowl appearance in 2002, when they played Tampa Bay in the NFC Championship.

But unfortunately, the Buccaneers' defense played superb and shocked the Eagles for the win. Before that, the Philadelphia Flyers loss to New Jersey in 2000 after having a commanding 3-1 lead in the series. The Devils won the game late in Game 7, breaking the hearts of a championship-starved town.

Although booing all four of their major pro sports teams, still the loyal crowd deeply falls in love with all four of their major pro sports teams. They aren’t booing now, but are cheering, eager to witness another championship before the century comes to a closure.

Yet again, the Phillies gives a die-hard community opportunities to hold a long-awaited parade down Broad Street, where fans will show aggressively cheer proudly without needing boos as a message to mend its performance level. Yes, a rowdy bunch booed teams before at games and after games.

Usually, when fans boo teams, it's true signs of love. After all, it’s the City of Brotherly Love.

The best sports fans in America, I might add.