Thursday, August 13, 2009

Louisville Disheartened by Rick Pitino's Sex Infamy

As peculiar as the revelations sound, Rick Pitino is the one special coach you truly admire. With brilliant success over the years, he has spent time mentoring kids with his savvy coaching customs. His style in guiding young stars to the next level is what describes Pitino.


For years, he has being a teacher who defines all the virtuous meanings of basketball. But now, the Louisville fans are shocked at the latest scandal, which puts a dent in Louisville’s tradition and hurts its chances of adding elite talent.

Suddenly, a wise and successful coach watches dreadful accusations unfold.

We want to believe the accuser has a case of mistaken identity, we want to believe the man who wears a white disco suit, with hair groomed neatly walking the courtside yelling out plays isn’t the one wanted on charges

The entire state of Louisville basketball is in a downcast mood and emotionally disheartened by Pitino’s sexual fling, which has had jaws dropping faster than a horse races in the Kentucky Derby.

According to a report in the Louisville Courier-Journal, Pitino acknowledged that he had sex with a woman named Karen Cunagin Sypher, at a table inside an Italian restaurant in 2003.

Two weeks later, Sypher informed Pitino that she was pregnant and planned to have an abortion without having health insurance to cover it. But Pitino’s lawyers said he took care of, when he paid $3,000 to have her operation done.

That is sending poor examples to talented players, inspired of Pitino’s influence. That is staining long years of applause for building a winning tradition. You swear from the never-ending cheers, he’s the mayor in a town that adores its basketball.

It is very much so a town, where Pitino serves as the state ambassador, leading and creating a social landscape. What a disaster for such a likable man who won a national title at Kentucky in 1996, and taught many players the importance of life, not just the fundamentals of the game.

But it’s difficult to teach others when problems strike in your life. Right now, Pitino’s life isn’t perfect, but more stressful and devastating.

Once again, we are witnesses to coaches and players who we tend to admire deeply, but find themselves in tough dilemmas because of a foolish mistake.

Pitino was known as a respectful person who never would do such a thing. He's married, a father of five children, and a faithful Roman Catholic.

But none of those aspects mattered, going against his morals to disappear with another woman. It doesn’t just affect his future with Louisville, but the program’s future, too. They were on the rise to top the rankings last season, and were in for a battle with John Calipari, who is rejuvenating a winning ritual to answer demands at Kentucky next season.

Not sure if the program will nearly rank as high as Kentucky with the disturbing news spreading around the community as a scandal overweighs the Cardinals intentions next season.

Either it will force Pitino to step down, or it will encourage him to stay and attempt to restore normalcy and trust level among the people. Anyhow, most disgrace will be forgotten, and will allow Pitino to focus strictly on guiding the players.

But an affair has Pitino stuck sinfully, and sadly, knowing he has put the Cardinals in a befuddled mess, especially in recruiting large amounts of talent to upgrade national title hopes. Pitino needs belief and can definitely pray often about having coaching opportunities active next season.

Nonetheless, it starts with first-class recruiting and superior play from the Cardinals as a unit.

As he committed adultery, Pitino has unhinged a recruiting class, changing the minds of athletes who were committed in signing their names in ink to play under one of college basketball’s premier programs and coaches.

But with all the distractions and clutters that can refrain winning enough games to qualify for the tournament, as Sypher faces federal charges for lying to the FBI and trying to extort $10 million from Pitino. After surrendering to authorities, her trial may last until the college basketball season gets underway.

Headaches are enough to turn players in opposite directions. They’ll sign with programs that have less situations and positive examples. One mistake can turn players away, and can weaken obligations in which Louisville may pay for their blunders.

Before earning back recruits, now, Pitino will have to maintain self-consciousness and refine trust again to reestablish a Final Four team, even better a national championship team. It’s hard to reshape into an effective program when half of the talented recruits are declining to commit.

Twenty-five considerations are expected to play in Louisville, but most of them will likely become newcomers elsewhere if infamous charges continue to cloud a once admired tradition.

Now they’re caught in turmoil, as most talented recruits will decide upon Pitino’s decision to either resign or take a leave of absence. It will work in other programs' favor, enabling recruiters to speculate on values without Pitino in his tailor-made suits on the sidelines, crossing his arms, and giving advice on each possession.

What a tough loss that would be for the university and players who were willing to have a role in Louisville.

They have already lost the recruiting war with Big East rivals Syracuse. The Brazilian, big man, Fab Melo, committed to enhance a college career with the Orange, turning down the Cardinals, who he had targeted greatly.

In the wake of the shocking news, there’s a slight chance they might even grab Samardo Samuels.

Michael Chandler, a 6'10" junior in high school whose stamina and toughness inside make him the type of big man they’re targeting. But now, he might change his mind and choose to play elsewhere, not knowing the status of Pitino.

Even though Pitino is the integral piece in guiding and engaging prosperity, the recruits are more vital to save a unique and well-liked tradition before it no longer endears quality that is commendable.

You would’ve thought Pitino knew.